Discovering herbal medicine course
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2023 Winner of a Free place on the Discovering Herbal Medicine Online Course.

The winner of our 2023 Competition for a free place on the Discovering Herbal Medicine online course, Stephanic Cleridou says she is “really excited and looking forward” to begin her studies. She correctly named the 6 photos of medicinal plants in the Competition, along with 8 other people who entered.

Stephanie was chosen as the Winner of the Competition on the basis of her answer to the question “what does herbal medicine mean to me?”. She has sent us this photo of herself and has let us use the following extract from her winning ‘tie-breaker’.
 
"....for me herbal medicine means using plants to treat all different kinds of health conditions and for the improvement of wellbeing. It means exploring the natural pathways that our ancestors used in order to recover from illnesses. It means teaching my children the power and benefits of using herbs in their everyday life. Herbal medicine is a way of life that should have been a lesson taught in every school."
 
We were particularly pleased to see that not only is she keen to learn more about the use of herbal medicine for the health of herself and family, but she sees herbal medicine in the broader context of human wellbeing, making the connection between what our ancestors have taught us and the need to cherish that knowledge for future generations.

Now Available Online!

To meet today's expectations, we have completely revised the Discovering Herbal Medicine (DHM) mailed-out course for its new life online. The original material has been retained, updated, and attractively restyled. New monographs have been added on popular over-the-counter herbal remedies and videos now introduce each of the twelve modules. We believe that this more readily accessible, online format of DHM will appeal to a wider audience who will be able to access it ‘on-the-go’ through a mobile phone! Find Out More.

Our Blog

Our blog

We continue to publish short articles on herbs and herbal medicine on our Discovering Herbal Medicine Blog. Our aim is to provide an eclectic mix of material to represent the many facets of herbs and herbalism ranging from cultivation, collection, and preparation of herbs to the latest herbal research. Debs Cook oversees the blog and she loves to contribute articles of historical and culinary herbal interest, as this has been her life’s passion.

Ann Walker uses her experience as a university teacher and a clinical trials leader to bring us brief, readily accessible summaries of research papers on herbs from the world’s medical literature as summarised in PubMed. While herbal research in the western world has been restricted for lack of funds, research on herbs in countries like India and Iran has flourished, because their governments support an integrated approach to medicine, combining modern and traditional modalities. Ann believes we can learn a lot about everyday herb usage from modern research.

  • dandelion

  • Hawthorn

  • pot marigold

  • Ribwort plantain

  • Red Clover

  • Elderflower

  • Heartsease

Heartsease

This charming little herb has a wide range of properties, including useful anti-inflammatory effects. It is mostly used by herbalists for chronic skin conditions, especially those with sticky discharge. An infusion of the herb is used as a remedy for cradle cap in babies. The high content of flavonoids makes heartsease suitable for many purposes. For example, it can be used to strengthen fragile capillaries that cause easy bruising in the elderly.